About the Book

The knowledge of good and evil we inherited from Adam is a dimension of our intellect so innate, so instinctual, so intuitive, so pervasive a way of responding to our everyday circumstances, it is virtually impossible to avoid.

Our propensity to rely on this understanding molds our demeanor and, once established, those tendencies can be difficult if not impossible to change even when we no longer want to live that way.

It shapes our outlook, acting as a filter for our perceptions, relationships, and experiences. It is an internal voice constantly reiterating events in our past or rehearsing future encounters so that we rarely exist in the present.

The apostle Paul called this knowledge his flesh—his fallen nature forcing him to serve the law of sin. Genesis states that in the beginning of their relationship, Adam and his wife were both naked but were not ashamed of their nakedness. When their eyes were opened, they became aware of the merits of their individual differences.

While those differences were there all along, they now compared their own uniqueness in light of their newly acquired understanding.

Unfortunately, the repercussions of these subjective assessments created feelings of personal embarrassment, shame, and a growing conviction their nakedness was no longer acceptable to their spouse.

This mindset is the fountainhead of our transgressions and is so insidious, we can overlook its impact or even its existence and concentrate instead on remedying unwanted habits.

By reducing sin to a list of offenses, we can convince ourselves we are becoming better persons by committing fewer sins than we once did. This attitude shifts our focus away from the devastating consequences of the wellspring of our sinful acts—consequences that produce an inner conviction we do not measure up.

The knowledge of good and evil is a ruthless taskmaster. It is at the heart of our expression of self. Even if we clothe ourselves with everything the world can offer in an attempt to feel complete and fulfilled, we will always find circumstances that undercut our confidence, leaving us feeling vulnerable and naked.

Who Told You That You Were Naked? by William Combs reexamines how sin came into the world through Adam, and how the Lord has redeemed us from our knowledge of good and evil by His grace through faith. This refreshing account of one tumultuous afternoon in the Garden of Eden will forever change the way you look at sin and salvation.

Searching for reason in the midst of this crazy world?

Who Told You That You Were Naked? by William Combs reexamines how sin came into the world through Adam, and how the Lord has redeemed us from our knowledge of good and evil by His grace through faith. This refreshing account of one tumultuous afternoon in the Garden of Eden will forever change the way you look at sin and salvation.

All profits received from the sale of books published will be used by the William Combs Foundation for charitable purposes.